Here are ten of the most frequently asked questions about our signs. Please read through the FAQ’s if you have a question. If your question is not found on this page, feel free to contact us and we will do our best to answer it!

1. What kinds of signs do you make?
2. What materials do you use?
3. How much do your signs cost?
4. How long will it take to get my sign?
5. I’ve decided what I want, now what?
6. Do I have to pay before seeing what the design will look like?
7. How do I choose my fonts?
8. How do I pick my images?
9. Questions to ask yourself
10. What makes a great logo?

1. What kinds of signs do you make?
In addition to creating custom signs for any purpose or event, we also offer many other great services. For more information as well as a complete list of our products and services, please visit our Products & Services page.
 2. What materials do you use?
Interested in purchasing a sign, but not sure what materials to use? No problem, we offer a variety of materials designed to suit your needs. For material descriptions, please visit our Products & Services page.
 3. How much do your signs cost?
The cost of a sign is largely dependant on the scale of sign and the choice and quality of sign materials. Contact us today for a free quote!
 4. How long will it take to get my sign?
You will typically receive your sign in 7 to 10 business days. We try our best to respond to your order within 24 hours with an initial proof based on your ideas. Sometimes the design period can become extended if you are not available by phone or email to comment on the process. Regardless, we do our best to create the sign from your final approved proof in 7 to 10 days. Of course, there are exceptions to this as there are times of the year that we get very busy and wait times may increase.
5. I’ve decided what I want, now what?
The purpose of a sign is delivering a message. It takes a whole lot more than throwing a bunch of letters on a panel and hoping people will see it. Our completed signs are compositions. Whether or not a sign is good depends on four critical factors: Balance, Rhythm, Oneness and Harmony.

For balance, a good sign must be pleasing to the eye. The ‘weight’ distribution of the sign is the first thing we consider. That doesn’t mean that everything has to be symmetrical; a well-balanced sign is visually effective and has stability in the arrangement of its elements. Balance depends on the amount of copy, illustrations or supporting images, letter styles and the purpose of the sign (whether it’s an advertisement, a welcome sign, etc.). Also considered is the distance from which the sign will be viewed and how fast the viewer will be traveling, if at all. When a customer brings in a great deal of copy for a sign, sometimes it is necessary for us to edit the copy in order to achieve a well balanced and effective sign.

Rhythm is what many signs lack due to too many letter styles within the same sign. Most signs look best when only one or two fonts are incorporated. Too many different styles of lettering on one sign can be visually distressing.

Oneness is when signs draw the viewer’s eye from the primary message to the secondary and so on. Oneness can be achieved by dividing the messages in order of importance and creating emphasis where needed.

Harmony is nothing more than incorporating balance, rhythm and oneness. Without being sensitive to grouping, letter styles and other design elements, the layout will not have harmony.

Almost always, our customers will deliver copy and design expectations which are a far cry from the proof we render for their approval. It has been our experience that when our customers let us exercise our design expertise by interpreting balance, rhythm, unity and harmony with professionalism and style, their signs deliver attractive and effective composition.

6. Do I have to pay before seeing what the design will look like?

All of our signs are custom designed. Each sign is crafted to specification even if it’s just “Beware of Dog”. Consequently, all work requires a deposit. We’ll design your sign by collaborating with you and sending as many proofs as are necessary to help you develop the perfect sign. Nothing is printed or fabricated until you approve the final proof!

We require payment in full on all orders under $500, and a 50% down payment on all orders $500 and above. After receiving your order and ideas, we create concepts or design ideas that explore the different directions we could take your sign. Once you’ve decided to go with a specific concept, we move on to revisions. Revisions take your selected concept and further it. During this process we work closely with you, sending you proofs, getting your feedback and making adjustments accordingly. We will continue to revise your concept until you’re completely happy with it. At this point, you approve the final proof and we go to print! Your sign will be exactly as it was in the final proof – no surprises!

Think of this process as having an artist and mentor guiding you through the creative process – beginning with your own ideas and ending with your approved final sign.

7. How do I choose my fonts?
The best way to choose a font that you like or that accentuates your message is to find signs or fonts that appeal to you (feel free to view our online portfolio for inspiration!) and let us know. We don’t restrict your font choice to a list – we can reproduce virtually any font, including custom fonts. www.MyFonts.com is a great resource if you want to search for a special font – there are many websites dedicated solely to fonts out there.

There is never a charge for revisions to design proofs because there are many important factors to consider when planning how your sign will look. Fonts are a powerful factor; they determine how your text will appear. Text in a certain font can deliver an entirely different message than text in another font. Font choice alone can convey formality, whimsy, rusticity and hundreds of other themes, from western to hunting to sailing or even cartoons!

8. How do I pick my images?
Images have a very powerful impact on the message on your sign. Just one picture can make an interesting message more compelling. An appropriate image, properly incorporated into a sign can actually service as a demonstration of who you are or what your message intends as well as supplementing the message with something that will show the viewer as well as tell them. This visual leverage will serve to enhance your sign and your message in a positive way.

There is no restriction with images, you can have one image or many on your sign. We are more than happy to work with images that you supply or to custom design images to suit your sign’s needs. Choosing to place an image on your sign can greatly increase not only the sign’s visibility, but also the aesthetic interest from potential customers, friends and viewers. Sometimes the image will grab a person’s attention before the actual words even come into view, thus making the viewer want to read the words because they were captivated by the picture that they saw.

9. Questions to ask yourself
– Visibility and Location
The number one consideration in designing your sign is where that sign will be located, especially if it will be an exterior sign. If vehicles and pedestrians travel both ways, two signs may be needed for maximum impact. How far will traffic be from your sign when the viewer first notices it? How much time will the viewer have to read the message? These factors will later determine your choice of copy, font, colour and size. Is your sign obstructed by other signs, shrubbery, trees, or buildings? Sign size or height may have to be adjusted to compensate for obstructions. Interior signs, banners and window lettering must also be installed where they can be comfortably seen and read.

– Your Message
Your message should be simple and singular in idea. Since signs are scanned for only a short period of time, strive for the impression that lasts. What is it that you want to convey? The primary message should be brief – just a few words, but still get the idea across. Some additional text may be added but this should be secondary. For example, “Quality Foods” is primary, “Deli – Pharmacy – Bakery” is secondary. Too many ideas can compete with each other.

– Letter Size
Choose a letter size that will be easily seen and carry the most impact. Signs above the ground, such as a pole sign, need additional size to attract attention. Keep in mind that the more copy you have on a sign, the smaller the letter size will have to be. Maximum readability and impact is assured with a letter style that is easy to read.

 – Sign Color
The color of the lettering and background is an important consideration when designing signs. Do your colours contrast well? Do they make your sign easier to read, or more difficult? Make sure that colours look well together and have enough of a contrast.

 – Type styles
The selection of lettering styles is virtually limitless, but the use of an appropriate type style is very critical in conveying a certain “feel” to an intended audience. What is the function of the sign and what kind of business will it be advertising? How many typefaces should you use in one sign? Generally limit your selection to no more than two different styles. What are the various styles? Basically there are two categories. One is called sans serif. This kind of lettering is without any short lines of embellishments extending from the tops and bottoms of the letters. The other style is serif and this is the type that has the extra “bells and whistles”.

– Logos and Graphics
Designed logos and graphics make a sign interesting. Many signs that grab your attention have a graphic design. We can work with an existing logo, or work with you to design a new logo for your business or organization.

– Special Effects
Once your text is decided on, special effects can be used to provide a unique effect. Images can be compressed, stretched, slanted, distorted, rotated to any angle, and arced to fit a curve. The design possibilities are endless. These features can work hand in hand with logo or graphic design, too.

– Sign Layout
There are two types of space in the layout of a sign. This space is called negative and positive. Negative space is the space that is blank around your lettering and logo. Negative space is extremely important in projecting a balanced and total appearance. Where do you want this negative space? For one thing, you will need some for the borders of the sign. Negative space must also be balanced within the sign from one side to the other. A sign without enough negative space will look crowded and difficult to read.

10. What makes a great logo?
A great logo makes a company memorable. It accurately conveys the company’s identity and is attractive, but still functional. A logo should distinguish your company from your competition. Don’t try to emulate another company’s logo – be your own brand, stand out!

Your logo should use meaningful colours; different colours and shades can have different effects on people because of colour association. For example, green is associated with the environment, and would be a good choice for an environmental association’s logo. A good logo should also utilize an appropriate font. For example, if you’re a football team you may want to avoid graceful delicate lettering, and a ballet company should think twice about using a sharp, harsh and ‘clunky’ font. Your font says a lot about you – make sure it’s saying the right things!

Keep your logo simple. A logo is meant to make a quick statement and be memorable. Avoid having too much company information in your logo – your company title is often enough. Try to avoid using taglines or slogans in your logo. While they can be an important part of your company’s image, they can be distracting and difficult to read when incorporated directly into a logo.